Should the Sixth Petition of the Our Father Be Translated as “Do not Let Us Fall?”

I am grateful to Catholic World Report for publishing an article I wrote on whether it is best to translate the sixth petition of the Our Father as “do not lead us” or “do not let us fall.” You can read the article HERE.

The article began as a Facebook comment and evolved to a blog post which I submitted to CWR instead. I have reproduced the unrefined Facebook comment below (click “Read More” if you are on the homepage) followed by a comment from another person because there are a few elements I could not incorporate in the CWR article that I may return to later. Fr. Z suggests looking at the Catechism’s explanation and Fr. Hunwicke offers some interesting information on how the Our Father was viewed eschatologically in its fourth petition. Also, it appears the Italian Bishop’s Conference is changing their translation of the sixth petition. Continue reading

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A Refutation of Matt Slick’s Exegesis of Matt 16:18

The Catholic Church teaches that Jesus entrusted St. Peter the Apostle with the unique office to be the rock or foundation to keep the Church firm in her faith and this mission has continued through St. Peter’s successors, the popes.1 Several biblical texts support St. Peter’s unique role including Peter being renamed by Jesus, Peter always being mentioned first in the list of the apostles, and Jesus telling Peter to “Feed my lambs.” Matt Slick, the founder of the helpful Christian Apologetics and Research Ministry website, disagrees with the Catholic Church’s position and argues that Peter is not the rock on which Christ built His Church.2 Instead of proving Peter’s preeminence among the apostles, it will be demonstrated that Slick’s argument is not exegetically sound and he does not adequately disprove the Catholic Church’s position. Continue reading

My Review of “The Inspiration and Truth of Sacred Scripture.”

Posted here from Catholic Books Review.

This document by the Pontifical Biblical Commission (PBC) is a response to Pope Benedict XVI’s desire, in Verbum Domini no. 19, to see more research into the inspiration and truth of Sacred Scripture. The PBC is currently structured to be a biblical research organization under the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in the Catholic Church but it does not enjoy magisterial authority which means that this document does not officially define or establish any doctrine for the Catholic Church. Continue reading